Novel PET radiotracer reduces number of false

Novel 68Ga-FAPI PET/CT offers oncologic staging without COVID-19 vaccine-related complications.

Figure: Novel 68Ga-FAPI PET/CT offers oncologic staging without COVID-19 vaccine-related complications.
see more

Credit: Tristan T. Image courtesy of Demmert et al., Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Essen.

Reston, Va-A novel imaging agent, 68Ga-FAPI may reduce the number of false-positive PET/CT results in cancer patients recently vaccinated against COVID-19. New research published ahead of print Journal of Nuclear Medicine It shows 68Ga-FAPI imaging offers superior lesion detection in locoregional lymph nodes without the uptake of vaccine-associated tracers that are common. 18F-FDG imaging. This can help prevent costly follow-up and erroneous management decisions for cancer patients.

A side effect of the COVID-19 vaccine is 18fmRNA produced by FDG (the most commonly used PET imaging agent) vaccine is taken up by immune cells in response to inflammatory stimuli. This is known as a reactive uptake and does not always indicate that a tumor is present.

Researcher Tristan T. of the Department of Nuclear Medicine at Essen University Hospital in Germany. “This observation is concerning for vulnerable groups, such as oncologic patients who routinely undergo both the COVID-19 booster shot and medical imaging,” says Demmert. False positive results 18F-FDG PET may trigger incorrect management decisions due to reactive uptake.”

To find a way to avoid these false positives, the researchers compared two radiotracers, 68Ga-FAPI and 18F-FDG. Using a large prospective imaging registry, researchers investigated 11 oncologic patients who received the COVID-19 vaccine within six weeks, 68Ga-FAPI and 18There was F-FDG imaging on the same day, and documentation of tracer uptake in local lymph nodes. Visual reading of images was performed by two nuclear medicine physicians.

Significant lymph node involvement adjacent to the injection site was noted in 11/11 patients 18with F-FDG PET/CT vs. 0/11 68Ga-FAPI PET/CT. Also, 18F-FDG detected 73 percent of tumor lesions 68Ga-FAPI detected 94 percent of all tumor lesions.

“In patients with suspected tumors in the axillary region, an expensive follow-up is often recommended to avoid wrong patient treatment. According to our results, this could have been prevented using 68Ga-FAPI, which will allow higher tumor detection at the same time,” noted Demert. “Considering that more booster vaccinations are expected, 68Ga-FAPI may show its potential to avoid vaccine-related misinterpretation in PET/CT while providing equivalent tumor detection.”

This study was made available online in November 2022.

The authors of “the novel 68“Ga-FAPI PET/CT offers oncologic staging without the complications associated with the Covid-19 vaccine” by Tristan T. Demmert, Ines Merrick, Katharina Leukerth, Ken Hermann, and Wolfgang P. Fendler, Department of Nuclear Medicine, West German Cancer Center , University Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany, and German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), partner site University Hospital Essen, and German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Essen, Germany; Kelsey L. Pomykala, Institute for AI in Medicine (IKIM) , University Medicine, Essen, Germany; Jens Sieveke, German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), partner site University Hospital Essen, and German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Essen, Germany, and Bridge Institute of Experimental Tumor Therapy, West German Cancer Center, University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany; Benedikt M. Schaarschmidt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen, Universi ty of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany; and Rainer Hamacher, German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), partner site University Hospital Essen, and German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Essen, Germany, and Department of Medical Oncology, West German Cancer Center, University Hospital Essen, Germany.

Visit the JNM website for the latest research, and follow us for updates Twitter And follow us on Facebook pages @JournalofNucMed or LinkedIn.

###

Please see SNMMI Media Centre For more information on molecular imaging and precision imaging. To schedule an interview with the researchers, please contact Rebecca Maxey at (703) 652-6772 or [email protected].

About JNM and Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

The Journal of Nuclear Medicine (JNM) is the world’s leading nuclear medicine, molecular imaging and theranostic journal, accessed 15 million times per year by practitioners worldwide, providing them with the information they need to advance this rapidly expanding field. Its present and past problems Journal of Nuclear Medicine Available online http://jnm.snmjournals.org.

JNM is published by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI), an international scientific and medical organization dedicated to the advancement of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging – precision medicine that allows to tailor diagnosis and treatment to individual patients to achieve optimal results. Possible outcomes. For more information, visit www.snmmi.org.


Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! Not responsible for the accuracy of news published on EurekAlert! For use of any information by contributing organizations or through the EurekAlert system.



Source

Also Read :  How an emergency medicine physician chooses baby food for her kids

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.