Dhaka loses 510 bn taka due to extreme heat’s impact on labour: Report


Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh, has suffered losses currently worth around 510 billion taka due to the impact of extreme heat stress on labor productivity, according to a report. Sectors such as garment manufacturing, retail and transport in Dhaka may be particularly affected, impacting not only workers in the industry but the global supply chain as a whole.

According to the study, titled “Hot Cities, Chilled Economies: Impacts of Extreme Heat on Global Cities,” unadjusted economic losses will increase to over 1 trillion taka by 2050, using conservative growth assumptions. The report detailed the social and economic impacts of climate-related extreme heat through the prism of 12 cities on six continents with an urban population of more than 123 million people.

According to a report, Dhaka has suffered losses currently around 510 billion taka due to the impact of extreme heat stress on labor productivity. Sectors such as garment manufacturing, retail and transport in Dhaka may be particularly affected, impacting not only workers in the industry but the global supply chain as a whole.

Also Read :  Banks Jump Into the Metaverse but Concerns over Environmental Impact Linger

“Climate-induced heat is changing the way we live and work, but current awareness of this silent and unseen threat is dangerously insufficient. The disproportionate impact of heat on cities compelled us to quantify and study the economic and social impacts of our burning planet,” he said Kathy Baughman McLeod, SVP and Director of the Adrienne Arsht-Rockefeller Foundation Resilience Center at the Atlantic Council.

The heat is concentrated in some of the city’s poorest neighborhoods. In Kamrangirchar, a district with a high concentration of informal settlements with widespread use of corrugated iron roofs, temperatures are typically 12°C warmer than around Dhaka.

Dhaka’s people are developing innovative individual solutions to adapt to the heat, but the scale of the problem requires rapid scaling to protect the city’s residents and economy. Worker protection projects such as the Red Cross/Red Crescent FbF solution can be scaled up to provide vulnerable workers with broad social protection against extreme heat.

Also Read :  Taxpayer are down €45.7bn on bank rescues – C&AG report

There are weather forecasts from institutions such as the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts and the Bangladesh Meteorological Department, while projects such as the Red Cross/Red Crescent Heatwave Feasibility Study are working to formalize locally relevant and science-based heatwave definitions that will guide future campaigns on public health and safety.

The “Million Cool Roofs Challenge” pilot study in Dhaka has achieved significant cooling effects in schools, industrial buildings and substandard housing developments by using reflective roof colors to reduce indoor temperatures. In one case, indoor working temperatures dropped by almost 8°C at peak times, falling below outdoor temperatures. Other low-cost adaptations are already being used by Dhaka residents, particularly in informal communities, including building on stilts to promote air circulation (and improve flood resilience) and establishing natural “green roofs” by having climbing plants cover iron roofs, it said in the report.

Also Read :  CIOs Say Data Management is Critical for Successful AI Adoption in New Global Research Report

For this report, only a portion of the ways extreme heat can affect a city’s economy and society has been examined, and it assesses the impact in ‘normal’ versus unusually warm years, meaning it takes a conservative view of the social and economic cost of heat provides . Impacts or costs to infrastructure, health systems, reduced education and training, or losses due to business interruption are not included.

The study was conducted jointly by the Adrienne Arsht-Rockefeller Foundation Resilience Center at the Atlantic Council and business consulting firm Vivid Economics.

Fiber2Fashion Newsdesk (NB)



Source link