Business hopes Manchester homeless eviction plan moves forward

A homeless shelter in Manchester will remain in place after a judge told the city to halt its plans to evict people while he considers a lawsuit but someone linked to a nearby business. He hopes that this plan will go ahead. Winona Social Club is around the corner. Pine and Manchester streets near Camp in the Queen City. Club treasurer Patrick Garrity said their business was “ground zero.” “It’s definitely affected business. I’d say our business is down at least 25%.” He said he hopes the city can afford it. Follow its eviction order for the homeless camp after a judge told the city to put those plans on hold while he considers a lawsuit filed by the ACLU. The club shared a letter sent to Manchester Police on January 11 asking law enforcement officials to enforce the no-trespassing order. “The ground here at 168 Manchester Street has been designated ground zero given that the club has attracted more interference in terms of business than any other establishment in the vicinity,” the letter read in part. “Our customers just don’t feel safe. Employees don’t feel safe, leaving night after night,” Gareth said. The owner of a day care in the area told News 9 she has now closed her doors and nearby business owners said they don’t know what else to do. Gareth said he threw bottles at people asking them to leave the property and a few weeks ago, he said he had to clean up blood from an alleged fight on his first steps. On Tuesday night. The judge said he would issue an order early next week.

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A homeless tent in Manchester will remain after a judge told the city to consider plans to evict people while he considers a lawsuit but one with a nearby business. It is hoped that the plan will go ahead.

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The Winona Social Club is on the corner of Pine and Manchester Streets in the Queen City near the Tabernacle. Club treasurer Patrick Garrity said their business was “ground zero”.

“It’s definitely affected business. I’d say our business is down at least 25%.” Gareth said.

He said he hopes the city will be able to pursue an eviction order for the homeless encampment after a judge told the city to put those plans on hold while he considers a lawsuit filed by the ACLU.

“It’s definitely a safety issue. It’s definitely a health issue,” Gareth said.

Gareth shared a letter the club sent to Manchester Police on January 11 asking law enforcement officials to enforce the no-trespassing order. “The ground here at 168 Manchester Street has been named ground zero because the club has attracted more interference in business than any other establishment in the vicinity,” the letter read in part.

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“Our customers just don’t feel safe, our employees don’t feel safe, leaving at night after closing time,” Gareth said.

The owner of a daycare in the area told News 9 he is now closing his doors and other nearby business owners said they don’t know what else to do.

Gareth said he threw bottles at people asking them to leave the property and a few weeks ago, he said he had to clean blood from an alleged fight off his front steps.

The city agreed to put its evacuation plan on hold until at least Tuesday night. The judge said he would issue an order early next week.

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