6 Personal Care and Beauty Products Buyers Almost Always Regret

Alvarez / Getty Images

Alvarez / Getty Images

If you routinely spend more than $100 a month on beauty and personal care items, you’re not alone. According to a Styleseat survey, Americans spend an average of $110 per month on beauty, fitness and wellness routines.

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But it turns out that those beauty and personal care products you spend so much money on are often not worth it. From expensive scrubs that banish cellulite from your thighs to fancy pore vacuums that promise a clear complexion, here are six beauty and personal care products that shoppers almost always regret.

swissmediavision/Getty Images/iStockphoto

swissmediavision/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Elements to reduce cellulite

With shorts season coming up in a few months, it’s understandable to try to make your legs look their best. However, the countless anti-cellulite creams, scrubs and gels that promise to smooth the skin are often not what they seem.

“More often than not, these offer a temporary reprieve (if at all) and make big promises they can’t keep,” said consumer analyst Julie Ramhold of DealNews. “Dermatologists note that caffeinated creams and scrubs may be the best candidates for temporarily reducing the appearance of cellulite, but none of them will be long-term, even with consistent use.”

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Piotr Marcinski / Shutterstock.com

Piotr Marcinski / Shutterstock.com

Expensive cleaners

Google “skin cleansers” and you’ll get pages and pages of results, some of which produce products that cost more than $100.

“Many dermatologists will notice that these are on the skin for such a short time that there’s no real reason to pay for super expensive brands,” Ramhold said. “People often find themselves buying these items only to end up using a small amount that may not even be cleaning effectively because they’re trying to make it last. While you don’t need to go overboard with a cleanser, you also shouldn’t use the bare minimum to try to clean the your skin after a long day, especially if you’re trying to remove makeup or environmental pollutants.”

Prostock-Studio/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Prostock-Studio/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Hair care brands

Don’t be fooled into thinking that salon hair care products are essential for your hair.

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“If you visit a stylist regularly, you can be hard-sold on which salon brands are best for your hair, whether you’re concerned about preserving color or just want shiny strands.” Ramhold said. “Drugstore brands can be fine, but even if you want a little extra, there are solid brands like Function of Beauty available at Target now at affordable prices that don’t require you to visit your salon to replenish your supply.”

lechatnoir / Getty Images

lechatnoir / Getty Images

Skin care gadgets that promise too much

Skincare gadgets are everywhere, including on your social media. But many of them are little more than useless.

“Things like pore vacuums or microneedling rollers can seem like an easy way to get skin treatments at home for a fraction of the price,” Ramhold said. “But they usually end up going one of two ways: either they’re so weak that they don’t really do what they’re intended to do (or what they promise), or they’re strong enough to cause irritation or other mishaps that you may end up having to visit later. a dermatologist to repair.”

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Gadgets with dubious claims may lure you in because they are affordable, but in the long run they may end up costing you more than if you simply consulted a doctor for your skin problems.

sturti / Getty Images

sturti / Getty Images

Creams to remove stretch marks

According to various studies and dermatologists, it is not worth buying such creams to remove stretch marks.

If you have stretch marks, like many people, and can’t live with them, see a dermatologist for treatment advice. If you don’t want to go the route of laser treatments or prescription topicals, some dermatologists recommend using over-the-counter retinol-based stretch mark-fading creams marketed as stretch mark-removal creams.

vgajic / Getty Images

vgajic / Getty Images

Over the counter tattoo removers

If you have a tattoo that you want to banish, over-the-counter tattoo removal solutions will not be effective.

According to dermatologists, products and topicals you can pick up at your local drugstore will do little more than fade the tattoo slightly. To get the results you want, you’ll need to spend your money on in-office laser treatments, which are unfortunately quite a bit more expensive than OTC solutions.

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This article originally appeared on GOBankingRates.com: 6 Beauty and Personal Care Buyers Almost Always Regret

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